Chris Nibbe – SWEET! Corn Brooms

Hand tied corn brooms

Presenting at
Lanesboro Community Center

202 Parkway Ave. South
Lanesboro, Minnesota

Lanesboro Community Center is handicap accessible.

Email: sweetcornbrooms@gmail.com

I entered the craft of corn brooms by way of an early morning bus conversation in 2013 to help a local history club re-establish their broom making exhibit. I mentioned that I grew up around the skill at another MN history show and discovered that the Days of Yesteryear hasn’t had a broom maker for about 10 years. When asked if I knew how to make brooms, I like to remember saying “”Not yet!”

January of 2015 is when brooming became a creative home hobby as well as an annual demonstration craft. I dabble with antique woodworking tools and methods for splitting and hand shaping handles for my unique art. With harvesting branches and saplings as well as being an up-cycler, I have no shortage of handle possibilities!

I wish to participate in the 2017 art tour as an emerging artist for the education, experience, and guidance shared by the event’s established artist. I want to learn how artists support, and possibly collaborate, with each other. I want to know what kind of artistic future is possible with brooms.

I love learning new techniques almost as much as I love trying to combine them in new and interesting ways. I collect ideas so they can serve as nourishment for my creativity, not for the simple act of preservation.

If selected, I would love to be chosen as best in show because I feel that my art can also be collaborative art. Since brooms have been an integral part of human life for as long as humans have tried to keep a clean living area, I believe they deserve a chance to take on a life of their own. Wood handles can be painted to match a personality with landscapes and characters. Brooms can be adorned with bangles and botanicals.

A handmade broom holds potential, has the ability to share genetics from any source, to have a rich future. The only limitations are materials, imagination, and one’s boldness to let it do the work it was designed to do.